Posts Tagged ‘process’

Enjoying making these.

November 9, 2014

debra fleury unfired wallform clay porcelain

Porcelain wall forms in the unfired state.

I love when it feels like the clay is creating the form and I’m adding the rhythm.

:  debra  :

Advertisements

Boston Home Magazine Article

September 24, 2013

debra-fleury-art-flow

Into the Wild, Boston Home Magazine. September 2013

:  debra  :

Red.

July 30, 2011

 

: debra :

Wall play.

July 2, 2011

On a sunny afternoon . . .

: debra :

The joy of sketching.

April 24, 2011

I’m working in my home studio. Our house is on a hill, so my studio feels like a tree house to me. The light is streaming in. I’m sketching up a storm and listening to the Wood Brothers. Today is all about possibilities and dreaming. I hope you are dreaming, too.

: debra :

‘Tidal’ – work in progress.

February 17, 2011

Porcelain, dark stoneware, underglaze and glass.

: debra :

Collaboration with Suzanne Stumpf.

January 22, 2011


These pieces are the result of a collaboration with Suzanne Stumpf, a ceramic artist from Natick (and former Mudflat artist). This collaboration began when Suzanne gave me a piece in the greenware state that she made with a combination of porcelain and paper clay. I added a grog-filled dark stoneware sculpture body using an expansion-style joint and split the piece into two. Then I bisque-fired the pieces and returned them to Suzanne to alter in the bisque state, glaze, and fire to cone 10 in her new electric kiln.

I find it interesting that these pieces have no ‘bottom’. They can rest on a surface in several orientations. Each orientation seems to express a different mood:

It was great fun surprising one another with our choices. We are looking forward to another collaboration, this time in reverse — I’ll start by giving Suzanne a greenware piece, she’ll add to it and bisque it, then I’ll glaze it. Look for the results here, and check out Suzanne’s work at www.ceramicsatthebarn.com

: debra :

Artist talk & potluck this Friday at Mudflat.

November 2, 2010

This Friday, November 5th I’ll be presenting work created at Mudflat Studio during my year-long Artist Residency. Potluck starts at 7:00 pm. Bring something to share. The talk begins at 8:00.

For address and directions go to: Mudflat.org

: debra :

First days at Mudflat!

September 23, 2009

Debra Fleury sketches and inspiration

Debra Fleury and Angela Cunningham Celebrate

It is official. I moved into my artist residency studio on September first. Corks were popped. Sketches got pinned up, bags of clay opened, and the shelves have already started to fill up.

My first month goal is to make as much work as I can, as quickly as possible. Working with nothing but speed and volume as the goals has been liberating and instructive. I’m honing my intuitive relationship with the clay, perfecting the dance, and discovering new forms.

IMG_6333

Part of the rush to make is that I’m adding terra cotta to my repertoire and I need to get a feel for this clay body as quickly as possible.

At first I felt very disappointed with this body. It feels so lifeless to me. I’ve worked with only about 100 pounds so far, but I’m finally noticing that it does have something special to offer to my process and I am looking forward to working with a new glaze palette.

Stay tuned. I’ll share some of the results here.

: debra :

The closed door.

January 9, 2009

flock_process

A friend of mine very kindly offered me the use of her private studio for two weeks, while she was away on holiday.

I was mad with excitement. For the first time in my clay experience I was going to be able to work behind a closed door, alone with my sketches and my thoughts. When the time came I spent every moment I could behind that door, making the same form over and over again.

What happened was magical. My thinking sharpened. I forgot myself for hours at a time, completely engrossed in the making. Soon I was surrounded by work, which was informing the work in my hands. Nothing was in the way of the process.

Two weeks and 202 pieces later I feel like I grew a dog’s year as an artist. I gained tremendous insight into my creative process and the ways of working that will feed it best.

And yes, there is definitely a closed door in my future.

: debra :

Beth Cavener Stichter workshop.

December 22, 2008

bethcavenerstichter

How do you spell epiphany? I’ve been in the conceptual weeds for a couple of months — trying to find my way to forms that speak to me, and straining against my technical boundaries. My studio situation was getting me down, too. I work in a community studio, which is wonderful and challenging at the same time. So many bodies milling about and not a lot of space for reflection, no room to spread out, no place to post sketches for contemplation.

This workshop was a revelation. Beth started with little formal clay training. She forged her own way with clay, failing a lot and developing techniques that aren’t supposed to work (if you listen to clay lore). Her process is remarkable. She makes these often enormous pieces that are completely hollow when she’s finished. They start as solid masses of clay thrown onto carefully constructed armatures. The mass of clay is then cut apart and each section is hollowed until the walls are 1/4″ thick. The thin walls make for a stronger piece, because the stress is spread out over a larger surface area.

Once the hollowing is complete, she puts the form back together again. After some adjustments, the piece is often cut into a couple of sections for firing. The process continues after the firing with grinding, reassembly, cold finishing, and sometimes porcelain slip application with a refire. Amazing.

Her risk-taking, explorer attitude and self-deprecating good humor really got me fired up to get out of my own way in the studio and forge a path to my own unique creative process. Thanks for a great workshop, Beth.

Beth Cavener - at work

Here’s an image of Beth in her Washington Studio. Notice the Plastilene mockette on the far right.

Below are some images from the tile show going on at the Clay Art Center in Port Chester NY, where the workshop was held.

tileshow1

tileshow2

: debra :

The love rock.

March 2, 2008

Dinosaur Pinchpot

My husband and I joke about the day ‘the love rock’ hit us. It was a moment before we were dating, when each of us realized that we were very intrigued by one another. It was high romance after that.

This little pinch pot is my clay ‘love rock’, which hit me a couple of months into my first clay class. It showed me that clay is the right medium for me.

But it didn’t start out that way.

I was very disappointed when it came out of the glaze kiln. It looked so different from the vision I had in my head. When I was finally able to see the piece objectively, I saw that it was much better than what I had imagined. The interaction of heat, glaze, and clay had informed my vision. The collaboration between control and happenstance had produced a much more interesting piece.

That is the power of this medium for me.

: debra :